Monday, October 6, 2014
gaychristian:

MATTHEW SHEPARD | NEVER FORGET

The life and death of Matthew Shepard changed the way we talk about and deal with hate in the United States. Since 1998, the legacy of this remarkable young man’s life has challenged and inspired millions of individuals to erase hate in all forms. Although his life was short, it continues to have a great impact on both young and old alike.
The story of Matthew Shepard begins on December 1, 1976 when he was born prematurely to Judy and Dennis Shepard in the small city of Casper, Wyoming. Matthew attended school in Casper until his junior year of high school when he finished his primary education at The American School in Switzerland. His experience abroad fueled his love for travel. He took the opportunity to explore Europe and learn multiple languages including German and Italian.
Matthew was an optimistic and accepting young man. He always put his family and friends first and had a special gift of relating to almost everyone. He was the type of person that was very approachable and always looked to new challenges. Matthew had a great passion for equality and always stood up for the acceptance of people’s differences. Throughout his life he expressed his love for acting by becoming very active in community theater both on and off stage.
Matthew’s college career took him to a number of different universities and later ended up studying political science, foreign relations and languages at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. He was extremely interested in politics and was chosen as the student representative for the Wyoming Environmental Council.
The horrific events that took place shortly after midnight on October 7, 1998 went against everything that Matthew embodied. Two men, Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson, lead him to a remote area east of Laramie where they demonstrated unimaginable acts of hate. Matthew was tied to a split-rail fence where he was beaten and left to die in the cold of the night. Almost 18 hours later he was found by a cyclist who initially mistook him for a scarecrow.
Matthew died on October 12 at 12:53 am at a hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado. His entire family was by his side for the last few days of his life. His funeral was attended by friends and family from around the world and gained the appropriate media attention that brought Matthew’s story to the forefront of the fight against hate.
This tragedy helped the nation wake up to the fact that hate and discrimination still lives in our communities, our schools and our families. Although his life was cut short, the impact of his spirit is great.
For more information check out Judy Shepard’s book The Meaning of Matthew.

gaychristian:

MATTHEW SHEPARD | NEVER FORGET

The life and death of Matthew Shepard changed the way we talk about and deal with hate in the United States. Since 1998, the legacy of this remarkable young man’s life has challenged and inspired millions of individuals to erase hate in all forms. Although his life was short, it continues to have a great impact on both young and old alike.

The story of Matthew Shepard begins on December 1, 1976 when he was born prematurely to Judy and Dennis Shepard in the small city of Casper, Wyoming. Matthew attended school in Casper until his junior year of high school when he finished his primary education at The American School in Switzerland. His experience abroad fueled his love for travel. He took the opportunity to explore Europe and learn multiple languages including German and Italian.

Matthew was an optimistic and accepting young man. He always put his family and friends first and had a special gift of relating to almost everyone. He was the type of person that was very approachable and always looked to new challenges. Matthew had a great passion for equality and always stood up for the acceptance of people’s differences. Throughout his life he expressed his love for acting by becoming very active in community theater both on and off stage.

Matthew’s college career took him to a number of different universities and later ended up studying political science, foreign relations and languages at the University of Wyoming in Laramie. He was extremely interested in politics and was chosen as the student representative for the Wyoming Environmental Council.

The horrific events that took place shortly after midnight on October 7, 1998 went against everything that Matthew embodied. Two men, Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson, lead him to a remote area east of Laramie where they demonstrated unimaginable acts of hate. Matthew was tied to a split-rail fence where he was beaten and left to die in the cold of the night. Almost 18 hours later he was found by a cyclist who initially mistook him for a scarecrow.

Matthew died on October 12 at 12:53 am at a hospital in Fort Collins, Colorado. His entire family was by his side for the last few days of his life. His funeral was attended by friends and family from around the world and gained the appropriate media attention that brought Matthew’s story to the forefront of the fight against hate.

This tragedy helped the nation wake up to the fact that hate and discrimination still lives in our communities, our schools and our families. Although his life was cut short, the impact of his spirit is great.

For more information check out Judy Shepard’s book The Meaning of Matthew.

Thursday, September 4, 2014

It matters less where you go and more the fact that you are going.

Monday, July 21, 2014

work struggles

  • co-worker: Maddie, can you figure out this problem?
  • me: yep, here's the solution I figured out instantly.
  • co-worker: I don't believe you. I'm going to ask corporate.
  • corporate worker: Here's the exact same solution that Maddie gave you.
  • co-worker: Oh good catch!
  • *corporate worker gets all the credit*

reflections and preparations

maddie-yagm:

It’s been about a week since I got my placement information, and I wanted to let it all sink in before I posted reflections. 

Immediate reactions: I have almost 0 experience working with adults with intellectual disabilities, and when I first learned my assignment, my mind went “oh! cool! wait, what?” 

The organization I’ll be working for is El Arca. Started by radical French Catholic priests in the 1960s, it’s become an international not-for-profit that provides home and growth for those with developmental disabilities. 

This is going to be a beautiful challenge. I’m very grateful for this opportunity, partly because it’s unlike anything I’ve done in the past. This kind of experience will also be so important and helpful farther in the future, especially if seminary is the path I’ll take. 

This is going to be a leap from my comfort zone. Not only will this be a new type of service, but a completely new place. Familiarity will be thrown out the window! And I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t the tiniest bit scared. The combination of new work and a language I only know partially is kind of daunting. But the fact that I know this beforehand is one more thing I can prepare myself for (or at least know that it will be difficult at first). 

Practicar, practicar, practicar. Well, I wish I could say that’s all I’ve been doing all summer. My Spanish is no where near the point I’d like, but everyone keeps telling me I’ll be so comfortable in a month’s time. We’ll see about that :) Until now, it’s Argentine movies, Duolingo and Harry Potter y el prisoniero de Azkaban (with a lot of Game of Thrones mixed in). 

Tuesday, July 15, 2014 Monday, July 7, 2014

As an assistant for professors/faculty teaching MOOCs (massive, open, online classes) I will never understand why people with bad internet connections sign up for online classes. 

"My internet has a really bad connection and I cannot finish assignments by deadline, is that okay??" 

why did you sign up for an online class if your internet sucks?!? 

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

recoveringhipster:

So stoked about the Hobby Lobby ruling today. Officially going to incorporate myself so I can get a religious exemption for my student loans debt they violate my deeply held religious conviction that all debts are supposed to be forgiven every seven years, as per the book of Deuteronomy.

weltomyun:

Faroe Islands

Want to visit. Please. 

givncvrlos:

faroe #07 (by níls)

Just fell in love with the Faroe Islands. Next worldy adventure?!? Ya know, after South America. 

givncvrlos:

faroe #07 (by níls)

Just fell in love with the Faroe Islands. Next worldy adventure?!? Ya know, after South America. 

Saturday, June 14, 2014
Buongiorno, #Venezia.  (at Ferrovia)

Buongiorno, #Venezia. (at Ferrovia)

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Jet lag

Is waking up at 2am WIDE AWAKE and knowing you’re definitely not falling back asleep.

So many hours until breakfast :(

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

YAGM blog

Hey—anyone interested in my YAGM activities, you can follow that blog maddie-yagm.tumblr.com.

Right now there’s pretty much nothing because I don’t know any details yet, but just to keep on your radar!

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

lots of big things ahead

My life is changing rather drastically in the upcoming months, so get ready for a poorly managed blog posts about graduation, moving to South America and God things.